North Carolina School of Science and Math

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Abstract

The failure frequency of pumps in astronomical applications is significant.  Consequently, a pump with fewer moving parts could decrease the failure rate, allow more efficient replacement of broken parts, and decrease mission expenses.  Peristaltic motion, a technique used biologically to propel fluids through the human digestive tract, can be mechanically mimicked to create a pump with few moving parts.  The contraction of nitinol wires in sequence compresses a tube, forcing fluids forward.  By using resistive heating and the structural properties of shape memory alloy crystals such as nitinol, this product can be integrated into electrical systems more easily, have greater control over fluid motion, and be subject to fewer mechanical failures. A novel development in the field of aerospace engineering, this product can be employed in a wide range of environments and conditions to meet the needs of specific customers.

PowerPoint

The North Carolina School of Science and Math PowerPoint contains all the information about their project including a Functional Block Diagram, Storyboard and other information specific to their experiment.

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